Control System Analysis, Electrical Engineer, PID Control

Design via Root Locus – Improving Transient Response via Cascade compensation

In this article, we discuss the PD controller and Lead Compensation, two ways to improve the transient response of a feedback control system by using cascade compensation. Typically, the objective is to design a response that has a desirable percent overshoot and a shorter settling time than the uncompensated system.

Improving Transient Response - Compensation

We have seen before that setting the gain at a particular value on the root locus yields the transient response dictated by the poles at that point on the root locus. Thus, we are limited to those responses that exist along the root locus. (See Sketching Root Locus with Matlab – Control Systems)

Unfortunately, most of the time the overshoot specification for designing control systems exceed the posibilities of the current root locus. What can we do then?

Rather than change the existing system, we augment, or compensate, the system with additional poles and zeros, so that the compensated system has a root locus that goes through the desired pole location for some value of gain. One of the advantages of compensating a system in this way is that additional poles and zeros can be added at the low-power end of the system before the plant. We should evaluate the transient response through simulation after the design is complete to be sure the requirements have been met.

There are two configurations of compensation mostly used in control systems design: cascade compensation and feedback compensation. These methods are modeled in Figure 1 and Figure 2:

Figure 1. Cascade Compensation of a control system.

With cascade compensation, the compensating network, G1(s), is placed at the low-power end of the forward path in cascade with the plant, Figure 1.

Figure 2. Feedback Compensation of a control system.

With feedback compensation, the compensator, H1(s), is placed in the feedback path, Figure 2.

Both methods change the open-loop poles and zeros, thereby creating a new root locus that goes through the desired closed-loop pole location.

Cascade Compensation - PD controller

As we said before, sometimes poles and zeros must be added in the forward path to produce a new open-loop function whose root locus goes through the design point on the s-plane, in order to meet design requirements. One way to speed up the original system that generally works is to add a single zero to the forward path.

This zero can be represented by a cascade compensator whose transfer function Gc(s) is:


This function, the sum of a differentiator s and a pure gain Zc, is called an ideal derivative compensation, or Proportional-Derivative PD controller. In summary, transient responses unattainable by a simple gain adjustment (proportional controller) can be obtained by augmenting the system’s zeros with an ideal derivative controller.

Let´s use the Root Locus of Figure 3 to find out how a PD controller works. There, we have the Root Locus of a control system which forward transfer function G(s) with unitary feedback is:

If K=1, the commands in Matlab would be:

>> s=tf(‘s’);
>> G=1/((s+1)*(s+2)*(s+5));
>> rlocus(G);

Figure 3. Root Locus for G(s)

Suppose that we want to operate the system of Figure 3 with a damping ratio ξ=0.4. Figure 4 shows that we can get this damping ratio with a proportional compensator, setting the gain K=23.7:

>> z=0.4;
>> sgrid(z,0);

Use right click to select the damping:

Figure 4. Location in the RL of a gain K=23.7 and ξ=0.4

Figure 5 shows the Step Response of the closed-loop system for Kp=23.7 and ξ=0.4, and the values of the main parameters:

>> G1=23.7/((s+1)*(s+2)*(s+5));
>> sys1=feedback(G1,1);
>> step(sys1);
>> stepinfo(sys1)

Figure 5. Step response of the closed-loop uncompensated system 

Suppose now that we want to mantain the damping ratio ξ=0.4, improving rise time and settling time, making the system faster. That would be imposible using only a proportional controller because we are limited by the Root Locus according to Figures 3 and 4.

The uncompensated system of Figure 3 could becomes a compensated system by the addition of a compensating zero at -2, in Figure 6, using a cascade compensator whose transfer function Gc(s) is:

>> G2=((s+2))/((s+1)*(s+2)*(s+5));
>> rlocus(G2);

Figure 6. Root Locus for the compensated system.

Figure 7 shows that we can get a damping ratio ξ=0.4. setting the gain K=51.2:

>> z=0.4;
>> sgrid(z,0);

Use right click to select the damping:

Figure 7. Location in the RL of  ξ=0.4

Figure 8 shows the Step Response of the closed-loop system for Kp=51.2 and ξ=0.4, and the values of the main parameters:

>> G3=(51.2*(s+2))/((s+1)*(s+2)*(s+5));
>> sys2=feedback(G3,1);
>> step(sys2);
>> stepinfo(sys2)

Figure 8. Step response of the closed-loop compensated system

Mantaining the same damping ratio ξ=0.4, Rise Time has improved (from 0.6841 s to 0.1955 s) and Settling Time has improved (from 3.7471 s to 1.1218 s). However, Overshoot has increased (from 23.3070 to 25.3568) and also the Peak has increased (from 0.8672 to 1.1420). Figure 9 compares graphically both of the responses, before and after the PD compensation:

>>step(sys1, sys2)

Figure 9. Step response of Compensated Vs. Uncompensated System.

Figure 9 also shows that the final value is closer to the reference value (1), so the steady-state error has improved with PD compensation (from 0.297 to 0.088). However, readers must not assume that, in general, improvement in transient response always yields an improvement in steady-state error.

Now that we have seen what PD compensation can do, we are ready to design our own PD compensator to meet a transient response specification.

1) Given the system of Figure 10, design PD compensator to yield a 16% overshoot, with a threefold reduction in settling time.

Figure 10.

In construction…

How do we implement the PD controller?

The PD compensator used to improve the transient response is implemented with a proportional-plus-derivative (PD) controller. In Figure 11 the transfer function of the controller is:

Figure 11. Implementation of Proportional-plus-Derivative (PD) controller.

Lead Compensation

Just as the active ideal integral compensator can be approximated with a passive lag
network, an active ideal derivative compensator can be approximated with a passive
lead compensator. When passive networks are used, a single zero cannot be
produced; rather, a compensator zero and a pole result. However, if the pole is
farther from the imaginary axis than the zero, the angular contribution of the
compensator is still positive and thus approximates an equivalent single zero. In
other words, the angular contribution of the compensator pole subtracts from the
angular contribution of the zero but does not preclude the use of the compensator to improve transient response, since the net angular contribution is positive, just as for a single PD controller zero.

The advantages of a passive lead network over an active PD controller are that
(1) no additional power supplies are required and (2) noise due to differentiation is
reduced.

In construction…

Source:

  1. Control Systems Engineering, Nise

Written by:

Prof. Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer

Twitter: @dademuch

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, UCV CCs

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, USB Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca. telf – 0998524011

WhatsApp: +593998524011   +593981478463 

Twitter: @dademuch

FACEBOOK: DademuchConnection

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

 

Anuncios
Circuit Analysis, Electrical Engineer, Ingeniería Eléctrica

Relaciones fasoriales de los elementos de un circuito eléctrico

La resistencia, el inductor y el capacitor en circuitos de corriente alterna, requieren de un método de estudio particular. El siguiente método permite transformar la relación tensión-corriente del dominio del tiempo al dominio de la frecuencia (dominio fasorial), de los elementos pasivos de una red: resistencia, inductor y capacitor.

Resistor o resistencia

Supongamos que la corriente ir(t) que pasa a través de un resistor r, tiene la siguiente expresión matemática:

De acuerdo a lo discutido en Representación Fasorial de voltajes y corrientes – Fasores, en notación fasorial polar, ir(t)  puede ser escrita como:

De acuerdo con la Ley de Ohm, la tensión a través del resistor está dada por:

La ecuación (1) podemos expresarla mediante notación fasorial de la siguiente manera:

La relación entre el voltaje y la corriente en un resistor se puede apreciar en la Figura (1) tanto en el dominio del tiempo como en el dominio de la frecuencia:

Figura 1. Relación de voltaje-corriente del resistor; a) dominio del tiempo; b) dominio de la frecuencia.

La ecuación (2) indica que el voltaje y la corriente en un resistor tienen la misma fase, es decir, están en fase, lo que se puede apreciar en el diagrama fasorial de la Figura (2):

Figura 2. Diagrama Fasorial para la relación voltaje-corriente en el resistor r.
Inductor o inductancia

Supongamos que la corriente il(t) que pasa a través de un inductor L, tiene la siguiente expresión matemática y expresión fasorial exponencial:

De acuerdo con la Ley de Ohm, la tensión a través del inductor está dada por:

Debido a que:

La ecuación (3) se transforma en:

La ecuación (4) podemos expresarla mediante notación fasorial de la siguiente manera:

Debido a que:

Podemos reescribir la ecuación (5):

La relación entre el voltaje y la corriente en un resistor se puede apreciar en la Figura (3) tanto en el dominio del tiempo como en el dominio de la frecuencia:

Figura 3. Relación de voltaje-corriente del Inductor L; a) dominio del tiempo; b) dominio de la frecuencia.

 

La ecuación (5) indica que el voltaje se adelanta 90 grados con respecto a la corriente. En ingeniería eléctrica por convención se prefiere decir que la corriente se atrasa con respecto a el voltaje, lo que se puede apreciar en el diagrama fasorial de la Figura (4):

Figura 4. Diagrama Fasorial para la relación voltaje-corriente en el inductor l. La corriente se atrasa 90° respecto al voltaje.

 

Capacitor o capacitancia

Supongamos que la corriente vc(t) que pasa a través de un capacitor c, tiene la siguiente expresión matemáticany expresión fasorial exponencial:

De acuerdo con la Ley de Ohm, la tensión a través del capacitor está dada por:

La ecuación (6) podemos expresarla mediante notación fasorial de la siguiente manera:

Podemos reescribir la ecuación (7):

Es decir:

La relación entre el voltaje y la corriente en un capacitor se puede apreciar en la Figura (5) tanto en el dominio del tiempo como en el dominio de la frecuencia:

Figura 5. Diagrama Fasorial para la relación voltaje-corriente en el capacitor C. La corriente se adelanta 90° respecto al voltaje.

La ecuación (6) indica que el voltaje se atrasa 90 grados con respecto a la corriente. En ingeniería eléctrica por convención se prefiere decir que la corriente se adelanta con respecto al voltaje, lo que se puede apreciar en el diagrama fasorial de la Figura (6):

Figura 6. Diagrama Fasorial para la relación voltaje-corriente en el inductor C. La corriente se adelanta 90° respecto al voltaje.

En resumen:

Figura 7. Resumen de relación de voltaje-corriente de los elementos pasivos de un circuito eléctrico: resistencia, inductor y capacitor.

ANTERIOR: Representación Fasorial de voltajes y corrientes – Fasores

SIGUIENTE: La impedancia y la admitancia de un circuito eléctrico.

Fuentes:

  1. Introduccion-al-analisis-de-circuitos-robert-l-boylestad,
  2. Análisis de Redes – Van Valkenburg,
  3. Fundamentos_de_circuitos_electricos_5ta

Escrito por Prof. Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer – Twitter: @dademuch

Mentoring Académico / Emprendedores / Empresarial

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, UCV CCs

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, USB Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca. telf – 0998524011

WhatsApp:+593998524011    +593981478463

Twitter: @dademuch

FACEBOOK: DademuchConnection

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

Edificio Inteligente, Sistemas de Potencia

Electrobarras – White Paper

ELECTROBARRAS

  1. Características Generales

El desarrollo de edificaciones de alto desempeño (HPBs – High Performance Buildings), desde Data Centers y Centros de Manufactura, hasta altos edificios y hospitales, requiere de un suministro de energía eléctrica eficiente, flexible e inteligente. El arreglo de conductores rectangulares o pletinas conocido como “Fases Pareadas”, en el sistema denominado Electrobarra, ha reportado excelentes resultados en la distribución de corriente alterna trifásica hasta un máximo de 600 voltios.

Las barras rectangulares son preferibles a los conductores cilíndricos en la conducción de corriente trifásica, debido a que se acercan más los centros de cada conductor; se minimiza la reactancia debido al efecto de proximidad, lo que minimiza las pérdidas de potencia. El arreglo más elemental de estas pletinas, para que conduzcan corrientes desfasadas 120 grados, se observa en la Figura 1:

Figura 1. Arreglo básico de electrobarras para un sistema trifásico balanceado.

Sin embargo dicho arreglo produce ciertos inconvenientes. En primer lugar se establece una condición de desbalance en la caída de tensión debido a que la pletina B es la más afectada y beneficiada por el efecto de proximidad (tiene menos pérdidas de potencia). El segundo efecto indeseado es que no hay cancelación del campo magnético, lo que produce el efecto pelicular: se concentra o se restringe la corriente en una zona del conductor, no hay uniformidad en el uso del material conductor, lo que puede generar un aumento perjudicial de la temperatura en la región donde se presenta dicha concentración de corriente.

Para minimizar el campo magnético y el efecto de proximidad, en el arreglo de fases pareadas se utilizan dos barras por cada fase. En la Figura 2 se puede observar esta configuración. La fase C se empareja con la fase A. La fase A se empareja con la fase B, y la fase B se empareja con la fase C:

Figura 2. Dos barras por cada fase en el arreglo de fases pareadas.

Las electrobarras se agrupan en pares, de modo que la corriente en cada par es casi igual en magnitud, pero opuesta en dirección, circunstancia que disminuye al mínimo la reactancia y, en consecuencia, las pérdidas de potencia. Las Figuras 3 y 4 ofrecen una idea de cómo se logra esto cuando se trata de un sistema trifásico balanceado, expresando matemáticamente cada fasor como la suma de dos vectores, o dividiendo físicamente cada corriente en dos subcorrientes de igual magnitud, para parear dichas subcorrientes con aquellas de otras fases, de acuerdo a lo comentado en la Figura 2:

Figura 3. Cada fasor de corriente es representado como la suma de dos vectores.

Figura 4. Cada corriente es dividida en dos. Luego, se reagrupan para establecer el sistema de fases pareadas.

Uno de los resultados fundamentales de implementar el sistema de fases pareadas es que se obtiene la mínima impedancia posible, lo que permite la máxima eficiencia en la transmisión de potencia. Otras grandes ventajas de esta configuración son: Caída de tensión baja y balanceada, aún en condición de carga desbalanceada; máximo aprovechamiento del material conductor, debido a que la corriente en cada barra es uniforme y la temperatura en cada barra es igual.

En las próximas secciones se detalla con mayor precisión cada uno de los efectos beneficiosos del sistema de fases pareadas de las electrobarras.

  1. Pérdidas ocasionadas por el efecto pelicular y el efecto de proximidad en un sistema de electrobarras
  2. Cálculo de Impedancias en un sistema trifásico de electrobarras.
  3. Cálculo de eficiencia de potencia transmitida en un sistema de electrobarras de fases pareadas.

En construcción…

Escrito por Prof. Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer – Twitter: @dademuch

Mentoring Académico / Emprendedores / Empresarial

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, UCV CCs

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, USB Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca. telf – 0998524011

WhatsApp: +593981478463

Twitter: @dademuch

FACEBOOK: DademuchConnection

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

Electrical Engineer, Flujo de Potencia, Ingeniería Eléctrica, Power Distribution, Teoría Electromagnética

Definición de Sistema Eléctrico de Potencia

Un sistema eléctrico de potencia es una herramienta de conversión y transporte de energía. Está compuesto por todas las máquinas, aparatos, redes, procesos y materiales utilizados para la generación, transmisión y distribución de energía eléctrica. 

El manejo de la energía eléctrica en los sistemas de potencia se hace principalmente en la forma conocida como corriente alterna. En la entrada del sistema, la energía que se encuentra disponible en la naturaleza es transformada de diversas formas (hidráulica, eólica, por combustión de fósiles, nuclear, solar, geotérmica) en energía eléctrica. La última etapa en este proceso de generación lo representa el generador eléctrico. En la siguiente ilustración muestra la representación esquemática de una gran turbina eólica comercial (1) que impulsa un generador de inducción de jaula de ardilla (4) por medio de una caja de velocidades (3). El estator del generador está conectado a la red de energía eléctrica (7) por medio de un transformador (6):

Turbina Eólica

Una vez generada la energía eléctrica, inicia el proceso de transmisión, que consiste en el transporte de grandes bloques de energía desde los centros de generación hasta los centros de utilización. Ya disponible la energía eléctrica en los pueblos y ciudades, los usuarios finales son habilitados mediante el proceso de distribución.

Los sistemas de potencia eléctrica se componen de líneas de transmisión de alto voltaje que alimentan a una red de mediano voltaje (MV) por medio de subestaciones.

power lines over sunset and birds flying.

En América, estas redes de mediano voltaje operan generalmente entre los 2.4 KV (kilovoltios) y 69 KV. A su vez, éstas redes abastecen a millones de sistemas de bajo voltaje independientes que funcionan entre 120V y 600V.

Comenzando con la planta de generación, cada parte de un sistema eléctrico de potencia utiliza subestaciones de mediano voltaje, unidades que contienen los siguientes componentes principales:

  1. Transformadores
  2. Cortacircuitos
  3. Interruptores de conexión
  4. Interruptores de conexión a tierra
  5. Relevadores y dispositivos de protección

Las líneas de transmisión poseen todas las propiedades de los elementos básicos de un circuito (resistencias, capacitores, bobinas y las conexiones entre todos ellos). Para el análisis y estudio de las líneas de transmisión, mediante un proceso de abstracción, todos estos elementos se consideran concentrados, aunque en la realidad estas propiedades están distribuidas a través de toda la red. El estudio de las líneas de transmisión de un sistema eléctrico de potencia es el paso inicial para comprender a profundidad el comportamiento ondulatorio de dicho sistema.

A pesar de que la teoría fundamental de la transmisión de energía describe su propagación en términos de la interacción de campos eléctricos y magnéticos, el ingeniero eléctrico especializado en sistemas de potencia, estará más interesado en analizar la razón de cambio de la energía con respecto al tiempo en términos de diferencia de potencial (voltaje) y de la intensidad (corriente). Esta es la definición de potencia eléctrica cuya unidad de medida es el Watt.

Los sistemas de potencia funcionan con generadores trifásicos, por lo que el estudio de la potencia eléctrica requiere de destrezas para el análisis fasorial. Conviene antes, sin embargo, analizar la Potencia Eléctrica en Circuitos Monofásicos, y luego extrapolar este análisis al caso trifásico. Para poder analizar la Potencia Eléctrica en circuitos monofásicos, debemos dominar los elemental:

  1. Representación Fasorial de voltajes y corrientes – Fasores
  2. Relaciones fasoriales de los elementos de un circuito eléctrico

Fuente:

  1. Libro Analisis_de_sistemas_de_pot
  2. Análisis de Redes – Van Valkenburg
  3. Wildi. Maquinas Electricas y Sistemas de Potencia
  4. Getty Images

Revisión literaria hecha por:

Prof. Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer

Twitter: @dademuch

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, UCV CCs

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, USB Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca. telf – 0998524011

WhatsApp: +593998524011   +593981478463 

Twitter: @dademuch

FACEBOOK: DademuchConnection

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

Análisis de sistemas de control, Power Electronics, Sistema Electromecánico

Sistema de Control de Motor DC en Matlab – PWM (Pulse width Modulation)

Los actuadores en aplicaciones de robótica, en especial los Motores DC, deben ser controlados con precisión con el fin de obtener, por ejemplo, el movimiento deseado en brazos y piernas de un robot. Esto requiere del uso de amplificadores de potencia para suministrar el correcto nivel de voltaje (o corriente) a la armadura del motor. Para lograr esto, el uso de amplificadores proporcionales como el amplificador operacional resulta ser un método muy ineficiente y posiblemente destructivo debido a la gran pérdida de potencia en forma de calor. Una alternativa es el control de voltaje utilizando un conmutador ON-OFF. El PWM (Pulse Width Modulation por sus siglas en Inglés ) es el método más común para variar el voltaje promedio suministrado a un motor DC.

Modelaremos un sistema de control para un motor DC impulsado por una señal de entrada constante y observaremos que la corriente y el movimiento de rotación a la salida del motor cumplan con los valores esperados.

Este modelo muestra cómo utilizar el conmutador de voltaje conocido como PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) y el puente H (H-Bridge) para controlar un motor DC, el cual utiliza los parámetros de la hoja de datos del fabricante, que especifican que el motor entrega 10W de potencia mecánica a 2500 rpm y la velocidad sin carga de 4000 rpm cuando se ejecuta desde una fuente de alimentación de 12V CC. Por lo tanto, si el voltaje de referencia PWM se establece en su valor máximo de + 5V, entonces el motor debe funcionar a 4000 rpm. Si se establece en + 2.5V, entonces debe funcionar a aproximadamente 2000 rpm.

Para una revisión matemática de la dinámica de un motor DC, ver:

¿Qué es PWM?

PWM es una técnica para el control efectivo del voltaje de armadura en un motor DC, utilizando solamente un switch ON-OFF. La Figura 2.3.3 ilustra la señal de salida de un equipo PWM:

null

El PWM varía la relación entre la duración del estado ON con respecto a la duración del estado OFF. Un solo ciclo de estados ON y OFF representa el periodo del PWM, mientras que el porcentaje del estado ON con respecto al periodo del PWM es denominado “Duty Rate” (ritmo de trabajo). La primera señal PWM mostrada en la Figura 2.3.3, está a 60% de trabajo, mientras la segunda lo está a 25%. Si la fuente de voltaje que alimenta el sistema es V=10 volts, el voltaje promedio realmente transmitido al motor DC es de 6 volts en el primer caso y de 2.5 volts en el segundo. El periodo del PWM es establecido de tal manera que sea mucho más corto que la constante de tiempo asociada al movimiento mecánico.  La frecuencia del PWM está usualmente entre los 2 y los 20 KHz, mientras que un ancho de banda típico del sistema de control del motor es de 100 Hz. Por lo tanto, la conmutación discreta no influye sustancialmente al movimiento mecánico en la mayoría de los casos.

Si la constante de tiempo Te es mucho mayor que el período del PWM, la corriente real que fluye hacia la armadura del motor es una curva suave, como se ilustra en la Figura 2.3.4:

Modelo en Simulink
  1. Seleccionar Simulink Library del menú principal de Matlab
  2. Una vez en la librería de Simulink, seleccionar New Model
  3. En librería, seleccionar la siguiente lista de componentes y añadirlos al nuevo modelo. Para agregar componentes la modelo hacer clik derecho sobre el bloque que se desea agregar y seleccionar Add block to the model.

  1. Los bloques se van agregando uno sobre otro, así que debemos ir separándoles en el modelo a medida que son añadidos. Según la versión de Matlab, la ubicación puede cambiar. Una manera de ubicarlos rápidamente es utilizar el buscador de la librería. Al finalizar el proceso de selección, nuestro modelo y sus componentes debería verse como sigue:

  1. Ahora, debemos conectar los componentes de acuerdo al siguiente esquema:

  1. Configuración
  1. Configurar el DC Voltage Source block parameters como sigue:
    • Constant voltage:  2.5 V
  2. Configurar el Controlled PWM Voltage block parameters como sigue:
    • PWM frequency: 4000 Hz
    • Simulation modeto Averaged

Este valor le dice al bloque que genere una señal de salida cuyo valor es el valor promedio de la señal PWM. La simulación del motor con una señal promediada calcula el comportamiento del motor en presencia de una señal PWM.

3, Configurar el H-Bridge block parameters como sigue:

  • Simulation modeto Averaged

Configurar el Motor block parameters como sigue, dejando las unidades por defecto:

  • Electrical Torque tab:
    • Model parameterizationto By rated power, rated speed & no-load speed
    • Armature inductance; 0.01
    • No-load speed: 4000
    • Rated speed (at rated load): 2500
    • Rated load (mechanical power): 10
    • Rated DC supply voltage: 12

Mechanical tab:

  • Rotor inertia: 2000
  • Rotor damping: 1e-06

Configure los parámetros de “Solver” para usar un “Solver” de tiempo continuo porque los modelos de Simscape Electrical solo se ejecutan con un “Solver” de tiempo continuo. Aumente el tamaño de paso máximo que el solucionador puede tomar para que la simulación se ejecute más rápido, como sigue:

  1. En el menú principal del modelo, seleccione SimulationModel Configuration Parameters para abrir Configuration Parameters dialog box.
  2. Selecciona 0de15s (Stiff/NDF) del submenú Solver
  3. Click OK.

7. Correr la simulación y observar los resultados

En el menú principal, seleccionar Simulation > Run.

Para ver la corriente y la velocidad hacer doble-click en el Scope windows para cada parámetro, los resultados esperados son los siguientes:

Fuente:

  1. DC Motor Model
  2. PWM-Controlled DC Motor

Escrito por Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer

Mentoring Académico / Emprendedores / Empresarial.

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, CCs.

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca. telf +593998524011

WhatsApp: +593998524011    /    +593981478463

Twitter: @dademuch

FACEBOOK: DademuchConnection

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

 

 

 

Electrical Engineer, Power Electronics, Sin categoría

Definición de Electrónica de Potencia

“La electrónica de potencia implica el estudio de circuitos electrónicos destinados a controlar el flujo de energía eléctrica”. Estos circuitos manejan un flujo de energía a niveles mucho más altos que los niveles manejados por dispositivos de uso común.

Introducción

En términos generales, la tarea de la electrónica de potencia es procesar y controlar el flujo de energía eléctrica mediante el suministro de voltajes y corrientes en una forma que sea ideal para las cargas de los usuarios.

La figura 1-1 muestra un sistema electrónico de potencia en forma de diagrama de bloques. La entrada de energía a este procesador de energía generalmente es (pero no siempre) de la compañía eléctrica a una frecuencia de línea de 60 o 50 Hz, monofásica o trifásica. El ángulo de fase entre la tensión de entrada y la corriente depende de la topología y el control del procesador de potencia. La salida procesada (voltaje, corriente, frecuencia y número de fases) es la requerida por la carga.

Si la salida del procesador de energía puede considerarse como una fuente de voltaje, la corriente de salida y la relación de ángulo de fase entre el voltaje de salida y la corriente dependen de la característica de la carga. Normalmente, un controlador de realimentación compara la salida de la unidad del procesador de potencia con un valor deseado (o una referencia), y luego dicho controlador busca minimizar el error entre los dos valores.

El controlador en el diagrama de bloques de la Fig. 1-1 consiste en circuitos integrados lineales y / o procesadores de señales digitales. Los avances en la tecnología de fabricación de semiconductores han hecho posible mejorar significativamente las capacidades de manejo de voltaje y corriente y las velocidades de conmutación de los dispositivos semiconductores de potencia, que conforman la unidad del procesador de potencia de la figura 1-1.

Marco conceptual de la Electrónica de Potencia

Se ha dicho que las personas no usan electricidad, sino que usan la comunicación, la luz, el trabajo mecánico, el entretenimiento y todos los beneficios tangibles de la energía y la electrónica. En este sentido, la ingeniería eléctrica es una disciplina muy involucrada en la conversión de energía e información. En el mundo general de la ingeniería electrónica, el diseño y el uso de los ingenieros de circuitos están destinados a convertir información, y la energía es simplemente una consideración secundaria en la mayoría de los casos.

¿Qué pasa con la conversión y control de la energía eléctrica? Las fuentes de energía eléctrica son variadas y de muchos tipos. Es natural entonces considerar el cómo los circuitos y sistemas electrónicos pueden aplicarse a los desafíos de la conversión y gestión de la energía. Este es el marco de la electrónica de potencia, una disciplina que se define en términos de conversión de energía eléctrica, aplicaciones y dispositivos electrónicos.

Power Electronics Vs Linear Electronics

En cualquier proceso de conversión de energía, como el que se muestra en el diagrama de bloques de la Figura 1-1, una pequeña pérdida de energía y, por lo tanto, una alta eficiencia energética es importante por dos razones: el costo de la energía desperdiciada y la dificultad para eliminar el calor que se genera debido a la energía disipada.

Otras consideraciones importantes son la reducción de tamaño, peso y costo. Los objetivos anteriores en la mayoría de los sistemas no se pueden cumplir con la electrónica lineal en la que los dispositivos semiconductores funcionan en su región lineal (activa) y se utiliza un transformador de frecuencia de línea para el aislamiento eléctrico. Como ejemplo, considere la fuente de alimentación de corriente continua (dc) de la Figura 1-2a para proporcionar una tensión de salida regulada V, a una carga.

La entrada al sistema o red de suministro (Utility Supply) puede ser típicamente de 120 o 240 V y la tensión de salida puede ser, por ejemplo, de 5 V. La salida debe estar aislada eléctricamente de la entrada de la utilidad. En la fuente de alimentación lineal, se utiliza un transformador de frecuencia de línea para proporcionar aislamiento eléctrico y reducir el voltaje de la línea. El rectificador convierte la salida de corriente alterna (CA) del devanado de baja tensión del transformador en CC. El condensador del filtro reduce la ondulación en la tensión de corriente continua vd. La Figura 1-2b muestra la forma de onda vd, que depende de la magnitud del voltaje de la red de suministro (normalmente en un rango del 10% alrededor de su valor nominal).

La relación de los giros del transformador debe elegirse de modo que el mínimo del voltaje de entrada v sea mayor que el deseado V. Para el rango de las formas de onda del voltaje de entrada que se muestra en la Fig. 1-2b, el transistor se controla para absorber la diferencia de voltaje entre v y V, proporcionando así una salida regulada. El transistor opera en su región activa como una resistencia ajustable, lo que resulta en una baja eficiencia energética. El transformador de frecuencia de línea es relativamente grande y pesado.

En la electrónica de potencia, la regulación de voltaje anterior y el aislamiento eléctrico se logran, por ejemplo, por medio de un circuito que se muestra en la Fig. 1-3a.

En este sistema, la entrada proveniente de la red de suministro se rectifica en un voltaje de corriente continua, sin un transformador de frecuencia de línea. Al operar el transistor como un interruptor (en un modo de conmutación, totalmente activado o totalmente desactivado  – 0n/Off) a alguna frecuencia de conmutación alta f, por ejemplo a 300 kHz, la tensión de corriente continua vd se convierte en una tensión alterna a la frecuencia de conmutación. Esto permite utilizar un transformador de alta frecuencia para reducir el voltaje y proporcionar el aislamiento eléctrico.

Para simplificar este circuito para el análisis, omitiremos el transformador y supondremos como entrada una fuente de voltaje DC de valor vd, lo que dará como resultado un circuito equivalente que se muestra en la Fig. 1-3b.

La combinación de diodo de transistor se puede representar mediante un hipotético interruptor de dos posiciones que se muestra en la Fig. 1-4a.. (provided iL(t) > 0).

El interruptor está en la posición a durante el intervalo t-on cuando el transistor está encendido, y en la posición b cuando el transistor está apagado durante la t-off. Como consecuencia, Voi es igual a Vd y durante t-on y t-off, respectivamente, como se muestra en la Fig. 1-4b.

Definamos:

where Voi is the average (dc) value of Voi-t, and the instantaneous ripple voltage V-ripple, which has a zero average value, is shown in Fig. 1-4c.

donde Voi es el valor promedio (dc) de Voi-t, y el rizado V de voltaje de rizado instantáneo, que tiene un valor promedio de cero, se muestra en la Fig. 1-4c

Los elementos L-C forman un filtro de pasabajo que reduce la ondulación en el voltaje de salida y pasa el promedio del voltaje de entrada, de modo que:

donde Vo, es el voltaje de salida promedio. A partir de las formas de onda repetitivas en la figura 1-4b, es fácil ver que:

A medida que la tensión de entrada Vd cambia con el tiempo, la ec. 1-3 muestra que es posible regular Vo, en su valor deseado mediante el control de la relación t-on / Ts que se denomina la relación de trabajo D (Duty Ratio) del interruptor de transistor. Por lo general, Ts (= l / fs) se mantiene constante y se ajusta t-on.

Hay varias características que vale la pena destacar. Dado que el transistor funciona como un interruptor, completamente encendido o apagado, la pérdida de energía se minimiza. Por supuesto, hay una pérdida de energía cada vez que el transistor cambia de un estado a otro a través de su región activa. Por lo tanto, la pérdida de potencia debida a las conmutaciones es linealmente proporcional a la frecuencia de conmutación. Esta pérdida de potencia de conmutación suele ser mucho menor que la pérdida de potencia en las fuentes de alimentación reguladas lineales.

En altas frecuencias de conmutación, el transformador y los componentes del filtro son muy pequeños en peso y tamaño en comparación con los componentes de frecuencia de línea.

Aplicaciones de la Electrónica de Potencia 

La mayor demanda en el mercado de electrónica de potencia se debe a varios factores que se explican a continuación:

  • Fuentes de alimentación de modo conmutado (dc) y fuentes de alimentación ininterrumpibles. Los avances en la tecnología de fabricación de microelectrónica han llevado al desarrollo de computadoras, equipos de comunicación y productos electrónicos de consumo, todos los cuales requieren fuentes de alimentación de CC reguladas y, a menudo, fuentes de alimentación ininterrumpidas.
  • Conservación de energía. El aumento de los costos de energía y la preocupación por el medio ambiente se han combinado para hacer de la conservación de la energía una prioridad. Una de estas aplicaciones de la electrónica de potencia es el funcionamiento de lámparas fluorescentes a altas frecuencias (por ejemplo, por encima de 20 kHz) para una mayor eficiencia. Otra oportunidad para la gran conservación de energía es en los sistemas de bomba y compresor impulsados ​​por motor. En un sistema de bomba convencional que se muestra en la Fig. 1-5a, la bomba funciona esencialmente a una velocidad constante, y el caudal de la bomba se controla ajustando la posición de la válvula de estrangulamiento. Este procedimiento da como resultado una pérdida de potencia significativa a través de la válvula a velocidades de flujo reducidas, donde la energía extraída de la empresa de servicios públicos permanece esencialmente igual a la tasa de flujo total. Esta pérdida de potencia se elimina en el sistema de la figura 1-56, donde un motor de velocidad ajustable ajusta la velocidad de la bomba a un nivel apropiado para entregar el caudal deseado.

  • Process control and factory automation. Existe una creciente demanda por el rendimiento mejorado que ofrecen las bombas y compresores de velocidad ajustable en el control de procesos. Los robots en fábricas automatizadas son alimentados por servomotores eléctricos (velocidad y posición ajustables). Cabe señalar que la disponibilidad de computadoras de proceso es un factor importante para hacer que el control de procesos y la automatización de fábricas sean factibles.
  • Transporte. En muchos países, los trenes eléctricos han estado en uso generalizado durante mucho tiempo. Ahora, también existe la posibilidad de usar vehículos eléctricos en grandes áreas metropolitanas para reducir el smog y la contaminación. Los vehículos eléctricos también requerirían cargadores de baterías que utilizan electrónica de potencia.
  • Electro-technical applications. Estos incluyen equipos para soldadura, galvanoplastia y calentamiento por inducción.
  • Utility-related applications. Una de estas aplicaciones es la transmisión de energía a través de líneas de CC de alto voltaje (HVDC). En el extremo de envío de la línea de transmisión, los voltajes y corrientes de frecuencia de línea se convierten a dc. Este dc se convierte de nuevo en la CA de frecuencia de línea en el extremo receptor de la línea. La electrónica de potencia también está comenzando a desempeñar un papel importante a medida que las empresas eléctricas intentan utilizar la red de transmisión existente a una capacidad mayor. Potencialmente, una gran aplicación se encuentra en la interconexión de sistemas fotovoltaicos y eólicos a la red eléctrica.
Clasificación de Procesadores de potencia y Convertidores

Para un estudio sistemático de la electrónica de potencia, es útil categorizar los procesadores de potencia, que se muestran en el diagrama de bloques de la Fig. 1-1, en términos de su forma o frecuencia de entrada y salida.

En la mayoría de los sistemas electrónicos de potencia, la entrada proviene de la red eléctrica. Dependiendo de la aplicación, la salida a la carga puede tener cualquiera de los siguientes formularios:

  1. DC
    1. magnitud regulada (constante)
    2. magnitud ajustable
  2. AC
    1. frecuencia constante, magnitud ajustable
    2. frecuencia constante y magnitud ajustable

La red eléctrica y la carga de CA, independientes entre sí, pueden ser monofásicas o trifásicas. El flujo de potencia es generalmente desde la entrada de la red a la carga de salida.

Los procesadores de potencia de la Fig. 1-1 generalmente consisten en más de una etapa de conversión de potencia (como se muestra en la Fig. 1-6), donde el funcionamiento de estas etapas se desacopla de forma instantánea por medio de elementos de almacenamiento de energía tales como condensadores y inductores.

Por lo tanto, la entrada de potencia instantánea no tiene que ser igual a la salida de potencia instantánea. Nos referiremos a cada etapa de conversión de potencia como un convertidor. Por lo tanto, un convertidor es un módulo básico (bloque de construcción) de sistemas electrónicos de potencia. Utiliza dispositivos semiconductores de potencia controlados por electrónica de señal (circuitos integrados) y, posiblemente, elementos de almacenamiento de energía, como inductores y condensadores. Según el formulario (frecuencia) en los dos lados, los convertidores se pueden dividir en la siguiente categoría amplia:

  1. ac to dc
  2. dc to ac
  3. dc to dc
  4. ac to ac

We will use converter as a generic term to refer to a single power conversion stage that may perform any of the functions listed above. To be more specific, in ac-to-dc and dc-to-ac conversion, rectifier refers to a converter when the average power flow is from the ac to the dc side. Inverter refers to the converter when the average power flow is from the dc to the ac side.

Further insight can be gained by classifying converters according to how the devices within the converter are switched. There are three possibilities:

  1. Line frequency (naturally cornmutated) converters, where the utility line voltages present at one side of the converter facilitate the turn-off of the power semiconductor devices. Similarly, the devices are turned on, phase locked to the line voltage waveform. Therefore, the devices switch on and off at the line frequency of 50 or 60 Hz.
  2. Switching (forced-commutated) converters, where the controllable switches in the converter are turned on and off at frequencies that are high compared to the line frequency.
  3. Resonant and quasi-resonant converters, where the controllable switches turn on and/or turn off at zero voltage and/or zero current.

 

Control de Motor DC

Brevemente, un sistema para accionar un motor (drive) tiene un diagrama de bloques semejante al mostrado en la Figura 27.1. Las cargas pueden ser un transportador, un sistema de tracción, los cilindros de una unidad de molino, el compresor de un aire acondicionado, el sistema de propulsión de un barco, la válvula de control de una caldera, un brazo robótico, y así sucesivamente.

null

El bloque descrito como “Power Electronic Converter” en el diagrama de la Figura 27.1, en el caso de un control PWM, puede usar diodos,  MOSFETs, GTOs or IGBTs. Los sistemas de servoaccionamiento (Servo drives)  normalmente utilizan el convertidor de cuatro cuadrantes de la Figura 27.7, que permite accionamientos (drives) bidireccionales y capacidades de frenado regenerativo.

null

PWM es una técnica para el control efectivo del voltaje de armadura en un motor DC, utilizando solamente un switch ON-OFF. La Figura 2.3.3 ilustra la señal de salida de un equipo PWM:

null

El PWM varía la relación entre la duración del estado ON con respecto a la duración del estado OFF. Un solo ciclo de estados ON y OFF representa el periodo del PWM, mientras que el porcentaje del estado ON con respecto al periodo del PWM es denominado “Duty Rate” (ritmo de trabajo). La primera señal PWM mostrada en la Figura 2.3.3, está a 60% de trabajo, mientras la segunda lo está a 25%. Si la fuente de voltaje que alimenta el sistema es V=10 volts, el voltaje promedio realmente transmitido al motor DC es de 6 volts en el primer caso y de 2.5 volts en el segundo. El periodo del PWM es establecido de tal manera que sea mucho más corto que la constante de tiempo asociada al movimiento mecánico.  La frecuencia del PWM está usualmente entre los 2 y los 20 KHz, mientras que un ancho de banda típico del sistema de control del motor es de 100 Hz. Por lo tanto, la conmutación discreta no influye sustancialmente al movimiento mecánico en la mayoría de los casos.

Si la constante de tiempo Te es mucho mayor que el período de PWM, la corriente real que fluye hacia la armadura del motor es una curva suave, como se ilustra en la Figura 2.3.4:

Fuentes:

  1. Power Electronic – Mohan
  2. Libro Rashid – Power Electronic Handbook

Literature Review by: Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist

Lunes 15 de noviembre, 11:08 am – Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil.

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas..

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Ecuador (Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca) telf. -593998524011

WhatsApp: +593998524011    /    +593981478463

Twitter: @dademuch

FACEBOOK: DademuchConnection

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

 

Control System Analysis, Electrical Engineer

Mass-Spring-Damper System Dynamics

Basic elements of a mechanical system.

The basic elements of any mechanical system are the mass, the spring and the shock absorber, or damper. The study of movement in mechanical systems corresponds to the analysis of dynamic systems. In Robotics, for example, the word Forward Dynamic refers to what happens to actuators when we apply certain forces and torques to them.

The mass, the spring and the damper are basic actuators of the mechanical systems.

Consequently, to control the robot it is necessary to know very well the nature of the movement of a mass-spring-damper system.

In addition, this elementary system is presented in many fields of application, hence the importance of its analysis. Again, in robotics, when we talk about Inverse Dynamic, we talk about how to make the robot move in a desired way, what forces and torques we must apply on the actuators so that our robot moves in a particular way.

Attention!

I recommend the book “Mass-spring-damper system, 73 Exercises Resolved and Explained” I have written it after grouping, ordering and solving the most frequent exercises in the books that are used in the university classes of Systems Engineering Control, Mechanics, Electronics, Mechatronics and Electromechanics, among others.

If you need to acquire the problem solving skills, this is an excellent option to train and be effective when presenting exams, or have a solid base to start a career on this field. Take a look at the Index at the end of this article. 

Before performing the Dynamic Analysis of our mass-spring-damper system, we must obtain its mathematical model. This is the first step to be executed by anyone who wants to know in depth the dynamics of a system, especially the behavior of its mechanical components.

We will begin our study with the model of a mass-spring system.

This is convenient for the following reason. All the mechanical systems have a nature in their movement that drives them to oscillate, as when an object hangs from a thread on the ceiling and with the hand we push it. Or a shoe on a platform with springs. It is good to know which mathematical function best describes that movement.

But it turns out that the oscillations of our examples are not endless. There is a friction force that dampens movement. In the case of the object that hangs from a thread is the air, a fluid. So after studying the case of an ideal mass-spring system, without damping, we will consider this friction force and add to the function already found a new factor that describes the decay of the movement.

 

Mass-Spring System.

 

Figure 5

The dynamics of a system is represented in the first place by a mathematical model composed of differential equations. In the case of the mass-spring system, said equation is as follows:

This equation is known as the Equation of Motion of a Simple Harmonic Oscillator. Let’s see where it is derived from.

If our intention is to obtain a formula that describes the force exerted by a spring against the displacement that stretches or shrinks it, the best way is to visualize the potential energy that is injected into the spring when we try to stretch or shrink it. The following graph describes how this energy behaves as a function of horizontal displacement:

As the mass m of the previous figure, attached to the end of the spring as shown in Figure 5, moves away from the spring relaxation point x = 0 in the positive or negative direction, the potential energy U (x) accumulates and increases in parabolic form, reaching a higher value of energy where U (x) = E, value that corresponds to the maximum elongation or compression of the spring. The mathematical equation that in practice best describes this form of curve, incorporating a constant k for the physical property of the material that increases or decreases the inclination of said curve, is as follows:

The force is related to the potential energy as follows:

Therefore:

It makes sense to see that F (x) is inversely proportional to the displacement of mass m. Because it is clear that if we stretch the spring, or shrink it, this force opposes this action, trying to return the spring to its relaxed or natural position. For that reason it is called restitution force. The above equation is known in the academy as Hooke’s Law, or law of force for springs. The following is a representative graph of said force, in relation to the energy as it has been mentioned, without the intervention of friction forces (damping), for which reason it is known as the Simple Harmonic Oscillator. It is important to emphasize the proportional relationship between displacement and force, but with a negative slope, and that, in practice, it is more complex, not linear.

Source: Física. Robert Resnick

For an animated analysis of the spring, short, simple but forceful, I recommend watching the following videos: Potential Energy of a Spring, Restoring Force of a Spring

AMPLITUDE AND PHASE: SECOND ORDER II (Mathlets)

Sistema MRA

Amplitude-and-Phase-2nd-Order-II

Going back to Figure 5:

We go to Newton’s Second Law:

This equation tells us that the vectorial sum of all the forces that act on the body of mass m, is equal to the product of the value of said mass due to its acceleration acquired due to said forces. Considering that in our spring-mass system, ΣF = -kx, and remembering that acceleration is the second derivative of displacement, applying Newton’s Second Law we obtain the following equation:

Fixing things a bit, we get the equation we wanted to get from the beginning:

This equation represents the Dynamics of an ideal Mass-Spring System.

Apart from Figure 5, another common way to represent this system is through the following configuration:

:

In this case we must consider the influence of weight on the sum of forces that act on the body of mass m. The weight P is determined by the equation P = m.g, where g is the value of the acceleration of the body in free fall.

If the mass is pulled down and then released, the restoring force of the spring acts, causing an acceleration ÿ in the body of mass m. We obtain the following relationship by applying Newton:

If we implicitly consider the static deflection, that is, if we perform the measurements from the equilibrium level of the mass hanging from the spring without moving, then we can ignore and discard the influence of the weight P in the equation. If we do y = x, we get this equation again:

Mass-spring-damper System

 

If there is no friction force, the simple harmonic oscillator oscillates infinitely. In reality, the amplitude of the oscillation gradually decreases, a process known as damping, described graphically as follows:

The displacement of an oscillatory movement is plotted against time, and its amplitude is represented by a sinusoidal function damped by a decreasing exponential factor that in the graph manifests itself as an envelope. The friction force Fv acting on the Amortized Harmonic Movement is proportional to the velocity V in most cases of scientific interest. This force has the form Fv = bV, where b is a positive constant that depends on the characteristics of the fluid that causes friction. This friction, also known as Viscose Friction, is represented by a diagram consisting of a piston and a cylinder filled with oil:

The most popular way to represent a mass-spring-damper system is through a series connection like the following:

Figura 6

As well as the following:

In both cases, the same result is obtained when applying our analysis method. Considering Figure 6, we can observe that it is the same configuration shown in Figure 5, but adding the effect of the shock absorber. Applying Newton’s second Law to this new system, we obtain the following relationship:

This equation represents the Dynamics of a Mass-Spring-Damper System.

Laplace Transform of a Mass-Spring-Damper System

A solution for equation (37) is presented below:

Equation (38) clearly shows what had been observed previously. An example can be simulated in Matlab by the following procedure:

Tcontinuo

The shape of the displacement curve in a mass-spring-damper system is represented by a sinusoid damped by a decreasing exponential factor. It is important to understand that in the previous case no force is being applied to the system, so the behavior of this system can be classified as “natural behavior” (also called homogeneous response). Later we show the example of applying a force to the system (a unitary step), which generates a “forced behavior” that influences the final behavior of the system that will be the result of adding both behaviors (natural + forced). Remark: When a force is applied to the system, the right side of equation (37) is no longer equal to zero, and the equation is no longer homogeneous.

The solution for the equation (37) presented above, can be derived by the traditional method to solve differential equations. However, this method is impractical when we encounter more complicated systems such as the following, in which a force f(t) is also applied:

Figura 7

The need arises for a more practical method to find the dynamics of the systems and facilitate the subsequent analysis of their behavior by computer simulation. The Laplace Transform allows to reach this objective in a fast and rigorous way.

In equation (37) it is not easy to clear x(t), which in this case is the function of output and interest. A differential equation can not be represented either in the form of a Block Diagram, which is the language most used by engineers to model systems, transforming something complex into a visual object easier to understand and analyze.The first step is to clearly separate the output function x(t), the input function f(t) and the system function (also known as Transfer Function), reaching a representation like the following:

r(t)=f(t), c(t)=x(t)

The Laplace Transform consists of changing the functions of interest from the time domain to the frequency domain by means of the following equation:

The main advantage of this change is that it transforms derivatives into addition and subtraction, then, through associations, we can clear the function of interest by applying the simple rules of algebra. In addition, it is not necessary to apply equation (2.1) to all the functions f(t) that we find, when tables are available that already indicate the transformation of functions that occur with great frequency in all phenomena, such as the sinusoids (mass system output, spring and shock absorber) or the step function (input representing a sudden change). In the case of our basic elements for a mechanical system, ie: mass, spring and damper, we have the following table:

That is, we apply a force diagram for each mass unit of the system, we substitute the expression of each force in time for its frequency equivalent (which in the table is called Impedance, making an analogy between mechanical systems and electrical systems) and apply the superposition property (each movement is studied separately and then the result is added).

Figure 2.15 shows the Laplace Transform for a mass-spring-damper system whose dynamics are described by a single differential equation:

null

null

The system of Figure 7 allows describing a fairly practical general method for finding the Laplace Transform of systems with several differential equations. First the force diagram is applied to each unit of mass:

For Figure 7 we are interested in knowing the Transfer Function G(s)=X2(s)/F(s).

Arranging in matrix form the equations of motion we obtain the following:

Equations (2.118a) and (2.118b) show a pattern that is always true and can be applied to any mass-spring-damper system:

The immediate consequence of the previous method is that it greatly facilitates obtaining the equations of motion for a mass-spring-damper system, unlike what happens with differential equations. In addition, we can quickly reach the required solution. In the case of our example:

Where:

These are results obtained by applying the rules of Linear Algebra, which gives great computational power to the Laplace Transform method.

Application examples ...under construction

Example 1.

Exercise B318, Modern_Control_Engineering, Ogata 4t p 149 (162),

null

null

null

Answer Link: Ejemplo 1 – Función Transferencia de Sistema masa-resorte-amortiguador

Example 2.

  1. Control Systems Engineering, Nise, p 101

Answer Link: Ejemplo 2 – Función Transferencia de sistema masa-resorte-amortiguador

Rotational Case

So far, only the translational case has been considered. In the case that the displacement is rotational, the following table summarizes the application of the Laplace transform in that case:

Example:

The following figures illustrate how to perform the force diagram for this case:

Therefore:

Being:

We observe that again it is true that:

Bibliography

:

  1. Robert Resnick, tomo1
  2. Dinamica_de_Sistemas, Katsuhiko Ogata
  3. Control Systems Engineering, Norman Nise
  4. Sistemas de Control Automatico, Benjamin Kuo
  5. Ingenieria de Control Moderna, 3° ED. – Katsuhiko Ogata
Attention!

I recommend the book “Mass-spring-damper system, 73 Exercises Resolved and Explained” I have written it after grouping, ordering and solving the most frequent exercises in the books that are used in the university classes of Systems Engineering Control, Mechanics, Electronics, Mechatronics and Electromechanics, among others.

If you need to acquire the problem solving skills, this is an excellent option to train and be effective when presenting exams, or have a solid base to start a career on this field. 

INDEX
Preface ii
Introduction iii
 Chapter 1———————————————————- 1
o Mass-spring-damper System (translational mechanical system)
 Chapter 2———————————————————- 51
o Mass-spring-damper System (rotational mechanical system)
 Chapter 3———————————————————- 76
o Mechanical Systems with gears
 Chapter 4———————————————————- 89
o Electrical and Electronic Systems
 Chapter 5——————————————————— 114
o Electromechanical Systems – DC Motor
 Chapter 6——————————————————— 144
o Liquid level Systems
 Chapter 7——————————————————— 154
o Linearization of nonlinear Systems
 References——————————————————- 164


Attention!

If what you need is to determine the Transfer Function of a System … We deliver the answer in two hours or less, depending on the complexity. In digital Contact us, immediate response, solve and deliver the transfer function of mass-spring-damper systems, electrical, electromechanical, electromotive, liquid level, thermal, hybrid, rotational, non-linear, etc. Optional, Representation in State Variables. Simulation in Matlab, Optional, Interview by Skype to explain the solution.

WhatsApp +593981478463, Inmediate attention !!

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com 

Service: 10 $ by problem.

Written by Prof. Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer

Mentoring Académico / Emprendedores / Empresarial

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, UCV CCs

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, USB Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca. telf – 0998524011

WhatsApp: +593981478463 

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

Control System Analysis, Electromechanical Systems

Solved Example 2 – Electromechanical system transfer function.

Find in generic terms, the transfer function of the unit feedback system shown in Figure P5.52 (b) of which the electromechanical system of Figure P5.52 (a) is a part.

1. System Dynamic

where:

2. Laplace Transform

3. Motor&Load Transfer Function (θm(s)/Ea(s))

4. Direct Transfer Function

For the system:

The open-loop transfer function Ga(s) is:

5. Closed-loop transfer function

The closed-loop transfer function Gc(s) is:

That is to say:

This problem is the first part of one where the transient response is requested so that the overshoot is 20% and the settling time is 2 seconds, see the complete problem in the following link: Example 1 – Transient response of an electromechanical system

Written by Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer

Mentoring Academic / Entrepreneur / Business

Copywriting, Content Marketing, White Papers (Spanish – English)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, CCs.

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca. telf – 0998524011

WhatsApp: +593981478463

+593998524011

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

 

 

 

Control System Analysis, Electromechanical Systems

Solved Example 1- Electromechanical System Transfer Function

Obtain the mathematical model of the position control system of the figure. Get the block diagram and the ansfer function between the angle of the load and the reference angle θc(s)/θc(s).

null

Data:

null

1. System dynamic

null

2. Laplace Transform

null

3. Block Diagram

null

Simplifying conveniently to obtain a model whose transfer function is known:

null

4. Transfer function of each block of the previous diagram.

Starting from:

nullWe obtain the following:nullThen, using:null

and substituting, we obtain:

null

Substituting the value of the data in the previous equation, we obtain:

null

Simplifying:null

On the other hand, the gain of the amplifier is obtained using:

null

From where:

null

null

Finally, the gear constant is given by the data and is n = 1/10. We then obtain a block diagram with the following transfer functions:

null

5. System Transfer function.

The open-loop transfer function Ga(s) of the system shown in the previous diagram is:

null

From where we can easily obtain the closed-loop transfer function Gc (s), which is what the statement asked, using the unit feedback:

null

NEXT: Example 2 – Electromechanical system transfer function (English)

Written by: Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer.

Mentoring Academic/ Entrepreneurs/ Business.

Copywriting, Content Marketing, White Papers (Spanish– English)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas.

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca – Telf. 00593998524011

WhatsApp: +593981478463

+593998524011

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

Electrical Engineer, Power Electronics

DC Motor Drive – Power Electronic

Introduction

A motor driver is a little current amplifier; the function of motor drivers is to take a low-current control signal and then turn it into a higher-current signal that can drive a motor.

A typical motor drive system is expected to have some of the system blocks indicated in Fig. 27.1. The load may be a conveyor system, a traction system, the rolls of a mill drive, the cutting tool of a numerically controlled machine tool, the compressor of an air conditioner, a ship propulsion system, a control valve for a boiler, a robotic arm, and so on.

null

The power electronic converter block may use diodes, MOSFETS, GTOs, IGBTs, or thyristors. The controllers may consist of several control loops, for regulating voltage, current, torque, flux, speed, position, tension, or other desirable conditions of the load. Each of these may have their limiting features purposely placed in order to protect the motor, the converter, or the load.

DC Motor Drives

Direct-current motors are extensively used in variable-speed drives and position-control systems where good dynamic response and steady-state performance are required. Examples are in robotic drives, printers, machine tools, process rolling mills, paper and textile industries, and many others. Control of a dc motor, especially of the separately excited type, is very straightforward, mainly because of the incorporation of the commutator within the motor. The commutator brush allows the motor-developed torque to be proportional to the armature current if the field current is held constant. Classical control theories are then easily applied to the design of the torque and other control loops of a drive system.

The mechanical commutator limits the maximum applicable voltage to about 1500 Vand the maximum power capacity to a few hundred kilowatts. Series or parallel combinations of more than one motor are used when dc motors are applied in applications that handle larger loads. The maximum armature current and its rate of change are also limited by the commutator.

Small servo-type dc motors normally have permanent magnet excitation for the field, whereas larger size motors tend to have separate field-supply Vf for excitation. The separately excited dc motors represented in Fig. 27.2a have fixed field excitation, and these motors are very easy to control via the armature current that is supplied from a power electronic converter.

Thyristor ac–dc converters with phase angle control are popular for the larger motors, whereas duty-cycle controlled pulse-width modulated switching dc–dc converters are popular for servo motor drives.

The series-excited dc motor has its field circuit in series with the armature circuit as shown in Fig. 27.2b. Such a connection gives high torque at low speed and low torque at high speed, a pseudo-constant-power-like characteristic that may match traction-type loads well.

We recall the block diagram for an armature-controlled DC motor:

null

Converters for dc Drives

Depending on application requirements, the power converter for a dc motor may be chosen from a number of topologies. For example, a half-controlled thyristor converter or a singlequadrant PWM switching converter may be adequate for a drive that does not require controlled deceleration with regenerative braking. On the other hand, a full four-quadrant thyristor or transistor converter for the armature circuit and a two-quadrant converter for the field circuit may be required for a high-performance drive with a wide speed range.

Thyristor

Thyristors are used to construct the first stage of an electric motor drive in order to vary the amplitude of the voltage waveform across the windings of the electrical motor as it is shown in Fig. 3.35.

null

An electronic controller controls the gate current of these thyristors. The rectifier and inverter sections can be thyristor circuits. A controlled rectifier is used in conjunction with a square wave or pulse-width modulated (PWM) voltage source inverter (VSI) to create the speed-torque controller system. Figure 3.36 shows a square-wave or PWM VSI with a controlled rectifier on the input side. The switch block inverter is made of thyristors (usually GTOs) for high power. Lowpower motor controllers often use IGBT inverters.

PWM

null

One of the basic functions in Power Electronic is Switching. Based on Figure 1.15, Switching Functions can be characterized completely with three parameters:

  1. The duty ratio D is the fraction of time during which the switch is on. For control purposes the pulse width can be adjusted to achieve a desired result. We can term this adjustment process as pulse-width modulation (PWM), perhaps the most important process for implementing control in power converters.
  2. The frequency fswitch =1/T (with radian frequency ω=2πfswitch) is most often constant, although not in all applications. For control purposes, frequency can be adjusted. This is unusual in power converters because the operating frequencies are often dictated by the application.
  3. The time delay t0 or phase Ø0=ωt0: Rectifiers often make use of phase control to provide a range of adjustment. A few specialized ac-ac converter applications use phase modulation

 

Source:

  1. Libro Rashid – Power Electronic Handbook

Literature Review by: Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist – Educational Content Writer.

Mentoring Académico / Emprendedores / Empresarial.

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas.

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Ecuador (Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca) – telf 0998524011

WhatsApp: +593998524011

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com