UNDERDAMPED SECOND-ORDER SYSTEM

Fuentes:

Control Systems Engineering, Norman Nise

    1. Introduction Chapter 4 pp 162 (162)
    2. Poles and Zeros 4.1 pp 162 –
    3. First Order System 4.3 pp 165-168
    4. Second Order System 4.4 pp 168-177
    5. Underdamped Second-Order System 4.6 pp 177-186
  1. Modern_Control_Engineering__4t
    1. Introduction Chapter 5 pp 219 (232)
    2. First Order Systems 221 (234)-224
    3. Second Order System pp 224 (237)-234

Literature Review, Martes 14 noviembre 2017, 05:07 am – Caracas, Quito, Guayaquil.

Introduction

Now that we have become familiar with second-order systems and their responses, we generalize the discussion and establish quantitative specifications defined in such a way that the response of a second-order system can be described to a designer without the need for sketching the response. We define two physically meaningful specifications for second-order systems. These quantities can be used to describe the characteristics of the second-order transient response just as time constants describe the first-order system response.

Natural Frequency, Wn

The natural frequency of a second-order system is the frequency of oscillation of the system without damping. For example, the frequency of oscillation of a series RLC circuit with the resistance shorted would be the natural frequency.

Damping Ratio,

We have already seen that a second-order system’s underdamped step response is characterized by damped oscillations. Our definition is derived from the need to quantitatively describe this damped oscillations regardless of the time scale.Thus, a system whose transient response goes through three cycles in a millisecond before reaching the steady state would have the same measure as a system that went through three cycles in a millennium before reaching the steady state. For example, the underdamped curve in Figure 4.10 has an associated measure that defines its shape. This measure remains the same even if we change the time base from seconds to microseconds or to millennia.

 A viable definition for this quantity is one that compares the exponential decay frequency of the envelope to the natural frequency. This ratio is constant regardless of the time scale of the response. Also, the reciprocal, which is proportional to the ratio of the natural period to the exponential time constant, remains the same regardless of the time base.

We define the damping ratio, , to be:

Consider the general system:

Without damping, the poles would be on the jw-axis, and the response would be an undamped sinusoid. For the poles to be purely imaginary, a = 0. Hence:

Assuming an underdamped system, the complex poles have a real part, , equal to -a/2. The magnitude of this value is then the exponential decay frequency described in Section 4.4. Hence,

from which

Our general second-order transfer function finally looks like this:

Now that we have defined and Wn, let us relate these quantities to the pole location. Solving for the poles of the transfer function in Eq. (4.22) yields:

From Eq. (4.24) we see that the various cases of second-order response:

Underdamped Second-Order System

Now that we have generalized the second-order transfer function in terms of and Wn, let us analyze the step response of an underdamped second-order system.

Not only will this response be found in terms of and Wn, but more specifications
indigenous to the underdamped case will be defined. The underdamped second order system, a common model for physical problems, displays unique behavior that
must be itemized; a detailed description of the underdamped response is necessary
for both analysis and design. Our first objective is to define transient specifications
associated with underdamped responses. Next we relate these specifications to the
pole location, drawing an association between pole location and the form of the
underdamped second-order response. Finally, we tie the pole location to system
parameters, thus closing the loop: Desired response generates required system
components.

Let us begin by finding the step response for the general second-order system of Eq. (4.22). The transform of the response, C(s), is the transform of the input times the transfer function, or:

where it is assumed that < 1 (the underdamped case). Expanding by partial fractions, using the methods described, yields:

Taking the inverse Laplace transform, which is left as an exercise for the student, produces:

where:

A plot of this response appears in Figure 4.13 for various values of , plotted along a time axis normalized to the natural frequency.

We now see the relationship between the value of and the type of response obtained: The lower the value of , the more oscillatory the response.

The natural frequency is a time-axis scale factor and does not affect the nature of the response other than to scale it in time.

Other parameters associated with the underdamped response are rise time, peak time, percent overshoot, and settling time. These specifications are defined as follows (see also Figure 4.14):

  1. Rise time, Tr. The time required for the waveform to go from 0.1 of the final value to 0.9 of the final value.
  2. Peak time, TP. The time required to reach the first, or maximum, peak.
  3. Percent overshoot, %OS. The amount that the waveform overshoots the steady-state, or final value at the peak time, expressed as a percentage of the steady-state value.
  4. Settling time, Ts. The time required for the transient’s damped oscillations to reach and stay within 2% of the steady-state value.

All definitions are also valid for systems of order higher than 2, although analytical expressions for these parameters cannot be found unless the response of the higher-order system can be approximated as a second-order system.

Rise time, peak time, and settling time yield information about the speed of the transient response. This information can help a designer determine if the speed and the nature of the response do or do not degrade the performance of the system.

For example, the speed of an entire computer system depends on the time it takes for a hard drive head to reach steady state and read data; passenger comfort depends in part on the suspension system of a car and the number of oscillations it goes through after hitting a bump.

Evaluation of Tp

Tp is found by differentiating c(t) in Eq. (4.28) and finding the first zero crossing after t = 0.

Evaluation of %OS.

From Figure 4.14 the percent overshoot, %OS, is given by:

 Evaluation of Ts

In order to find the settling time, we must find the time for which c(t) in Eq. (4.28) reaches and stays within ₎±2% of the steady-state value, C final.

 Evaluation of Tr

A precise analytical relationship between rise time and damping ratio cannot be found. However, using a computer and Eq. (4.28), the rise time can be found. Let us look at an example.

We now have expressions that relate peak time, percent overshoot, and settling time to the natural frequency and the damping ratio. Now let us relate these quantities to the location of the poles that generate these characteristics. The pole plot for a general, underdamped second-order system is reproduced in Figure 4.17.

Now, comparing Eqs. (4.34) and (4.42) with the pole location, we evaluate peak time and settling time in terms of the pole location. Thus:

where is the imaginary part of the pole and is called the damped frequency of oscillation, and is the magnitude of the real part of the pole and is the exponential damping frequency part.

At this point, we can understand the significance of Figure 4.18 by examining the actual step response of comparative systems. Depicted in Figure 4.19(a) are the step responses as the poles are moved in a vertical direction, keeping the real part the same. As the poles move in a vertical direction, the frequency increases, but the envelope remains the same since the real part of the pole is not changing.

Let us move the poles to the right or left. Since the imaginary part is now constant, movement of the poles yields the responses of Figure 4.19(b). Here the frequency is constant over the range of variation of the real part. As the poles move to the left, the response damps out more rapidly.

Moving the poles along a constant radial line yields the responses shown in Figure 4.19(c). Here the percent overshoot remains the same. Notice also that the responses look exactly alike, except for their speed. The farther the poles are from the origin, the more rapid the response.

Literature Review by: Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas.

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Ecuador (Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca)

WhatsApp: 00593984950376

 

Anuncios

Sistemas LDCID – Modeling – Fundamentos

Sistemas LDCID – Representación Matemática

Sábado 11 de noviembre, 4:53 am

Fuentes:

Análisis de Sistemas Lineales – Prof. Ebert Brea

    1. Análisis de Sistemas en el Dominio Continuo pp 29 – (58)
  1. Control Systems Engineering, Norman Nise
    1. First Order System 4.3 pp 165-168

 

 El modelo matemático y sus términos

Los sistemas lineales, dinámicos, causales, invariantes en el dominio y deterministas (LDCID) definidos en el dominio del tiempo continuo constituyen parte importante en el estudio de los sistemas eléctricos, debido al hecho de sus innumerables aplicaciones dentro de la ingeniería eléctrica.

En general podría decirse que los sistemas lineales son el resultado de aproximaciones en el modelaje de sistemas. No obstante, aun cuando los sistemas eléctricos forman parte de los llamados sistemas no lineales, su tratamiento como sistemas lineales permiten dar respuestas acertadas a las preguntas que pudiera requerir los profesionales del área.

Los modelos matemáticos de sistemas dinámicos definidos en el dominio continuo presentan términos asociados a operaciones de derivadas de las cantidades externas con respecto a la variable independiente, que por lo general será el tiempo. Estos modelos matemáticos se denominan ecuaciones diferenciales, y sus respectivas respuestas son totalmente definidas por las condiciones de cada sistema representado por el modelo matemático.

Un aspecto importante a estudiar la representación de un sistema a través de su modelo matemático es la identificación de los términos que son expresados en el modelo matemático de un sistema LDCID, el cual es representado por una ecuación diferencial ordinaria ( (ODE) involves derivatives of a function of only one variable) de orden m-ésimo en relación a la señal de excitación x(t), y de orden n-ésimo con respecto a su señal de respuesta y(t), es decir, en general un modelo matemático asociado a un sistema LDCID viene dado por:

donde y(t) representa la señal de respuesta también denominada señal de salida, x(t) representa

la señal de excitación o de entrada, y los coeficientes an;a1; …;a0 y bm;b1; … ;b0

representan los parámetros del sistema, que alteran respectivamente la señal de excitación y la señal de respuesta, así como sus derivadas ordinarias, y la variable independiente t, en este caso puede significar el tiempo, con el propósito de contextualizar el dominio en el cual está definido el modelo matemático.

Modelo matemático de primer orden

Un sistema LDCID en el dominio continuo de primer orden es representado mediante una ecuación diferencial dada por:

Note que el modelo debe ser de primer orden en lo que respecta a los operadores ,

es decir, en mayor orden de derivadas de la señal de respuesta y(t) debe ser n = 1.

Sin embargo, podría ser de cualquier orden con relación a los operadores de la excitación

para , debido al hecho de que las operaciones de derivadas sobre la señal de excitación no son consideradas parte del sistema.

Note que las operaciones definidas sobre la señal de excitación no forman parte del sistema, por cuanto las operaciones matemáticas definidas sobre la excitación constituyen el modelo matemático de la señal de excitación.

Por razones de simplificación en la nomenclatura y mediante la propiedad de superposición, se estudiará la solución de la ecuación diferencial:

Note que para obtener la solución del sistema debe conocerse al menos una condición de la respuesta del sistema, la cual usualmente es especificada a través de su condición inicial, y(0).

Luego de manipulaciones algebraicas convenientes (demostración en Fuente 1), se concluye que la solución a la ecuación diferencial representada por la Ecuación (2.12) viene dada por:

donde:

  1. Respuesta transitoria:

  1. Respuesta permanente

Ejemplo 2.2

La Figura 2.3 muestra un sistema compuesto por una resistencia y un capacitor, y cuyos valores son representados respectivamente por R y C. Además, la figura muestra que el sistema eléctrico es excitado por una señal x(t) = u(t) y su respuesta es medida a través de la tensión sobre el capacitor, donde u(t) representa la función escalón unitario:

El modelo matemático asociado al sistema representado por la Figura 2.3 puede obtenerse empleando elementales ecuación de redes eléctricas:

Entonces, al comparar el modelo matemático definido por la Ecuación (2.12) con el modelo obtenido, se tiene que el coeficiente a0 y la señal de excitación son:

,

Al aplicar la solución expresada por medio de la Ecuación (2.21), se puede afirmar que:

Al operar la Ecuación (2.26) se tiene que la respuesta del sistema es dada por:

Note que:

por cuanto el elemento de memoria representado por el capacitor no permite cambios bruscos y por tal motivo y(0-) = y(0) = y(0+). Además, para buscar una respuesta a la pregunta debe tomarse en cuenta que la excitación tiene un valor de cero y ella ha permanecido en cero desde mucho tiempo atrás, es decir, desde menos infinito, obviamente y(0) = 0.

FIRST ORDER SYSTEMS (Fuente 2)

We now discuss first-order systems without zeros to define a performance specification for such a system…

We now use Eqs. (4.6), (4.7), and (4.8) to define three transient response performance specifications:

 

  • Time Constant: We call 1/a the time constant of the response. From Eq. (4.7), the time constant can be described as the time for to decay to 37% of its initial value. Alternately, from Eq. (4.8) the time constant is the time it takes for the step response to rise to 63% of its final value.

The reciprocal of the time constant has the units (1/seconds), or frequency. Thus, we can call the parameter a the exponential frequency. Thus, the time constant can be considered a transient response specification for a first order system, since it is related to the speed at which the system responds to a step input.Since the pole of the transfer function is at a, we can say the pole is located at the reciprocal of the time constant, and the farther the pole from the imaginary axis, the faster the transient response.

 

  • Rise Time (Tr): Rise time is defined as the time for the waveform to go from 0.1 to 0.9 of its final value.

 

  • Settling Time (Ts): Settling time is defined as the time for the response to reach, and stay within, 2% of its final value.2

Modelo matemático de orden superior.

En este apartado se introducirá el operador p, el cual será empleado para representar el orden de la derivada que está operando en cada término de la ecuación diferencial ordinaria bajo estudio.

Definición 2.1 (Operador p) Se define el operador pn al operador diferencial que representa

la derivada n-ésima con respecto a la variable del dominio continuo. Es decir,

Por otra parte, se debe introducir dos definiciones que conforman la solución completa de una ecuación diferencial ordinaria.

Definición 2.2 (Respuesta transitoria) La respuesta transitoria o, también denominada natural o solución homogénea, es la solución de toda ecuación diferencial ordinaria cuando su señal de excitación viene definida por la función nula.

Definición 2.3 (Respuesta permanente) La respuesta permanente o, también denominada forzada o solución particular, es la solución de la ecuación diferencial ordinaria ante una señal de excitación que actúa sobre el sistema.

Observación 2.1 La respuesta transitoria, natural u homogénea es intrínseca del sistema y no de la excitación, a diferencia de que la respuesta permanente, forzada o particular, que además de depender del sistema, depende de la excitación.

Se conocen condiciones del sistema, bien sean condiciones iniciales a través del valor de la respuesta y(t) para t = 0 y sus primeras n-1 derivadas para t = 0, ó n valores conocidos de la respuesta completa y(t) en n distintos instantes de t, o combinación de lo anterior.

Se tiene que:

donde el coeficiente o también denominado parámetro an = 1 (ODE with leading coefficient equal to 1 is called standard ODE form)

Aplicando las Ecuaciones (2.46), se puede escribir el modelo matemático definido por la Ecuación (2.45) como:

donde D(p) es el ampliamente conocido polinomio característico del sistema.

Respuesta Transitoria

Existen diversos métodos para determinar la respuesta transitoria de un modelo matemático asociado a un sistema LDCID en el dominio continuo, el cual es representado por una ecuación diferencial ordinaria.

Método 2.1 (Determinación de la Respuesta Transitoria) Dada la ecuación diferencial ordinaria definida por la Ecuación (2.44),

Ejecute:

Paso 1. Asegúrese de que el término an de la ecuación diferencial sea igual a uno. Si no es así, divida toda la ecuación diferencial entre an.

Paso 2. Aplique el operador “p” a la ecuación diferencial.

Paso 3. Determine las n raíces que anulen el polinomio D(p) y denote las raíces reales como ri para cada i = 1; … ;nr, y las raíces complejas conjugadas como

para cada i = nr +1; ..;n, donde

tomando en cuenta la multiplicidad de cada una de las raíces denotada como mi.

EJEMPLO 2.5 Respuesta transitoria de un sistema de quinto orden

Suponga el modelo matemático de un sistema LDCID en tiempo continuo definido

por:

donde y(t) es la señal de respuesta del sistema, y x(t) representa la señal de excitación. Para el modelo matemático definido mediante la Ecuación (2.48), determine la solución homogénea del sistema aplicando el Método 2.1.

Solución. Debido a que el término a5 no es igual a 1, se debe dividir toda la ecuación diferencial entre a5, para luego aplicar el operador p, obteniéndose:

Al calcular las cinco raíces que anulan D(p), se tiene que sus raíces son: r1 = -2, r22= -3 y

z3 = -1 +- j. Entonces, se puede afirmar que las soluciones asociadas a cada raíz viene dada por:

Respuesta Permanente

Al despejar y(t) de la Ecuación (2.47):

se tiene que

donde la fracción N(p)/D(p) representa el operador del sistema L(p).

A fin de estudiar el caso más general de las señales de excitaciones más comúnmente presentes en los sistemas eléctricos, se analizará cuando la señal de excitación es considerada una exponencial definida por:

donde en general s es un parámetro o coeficiente complejo, y cuyo valor es

y B es un parámetro constante de la señal de excitación, que pertenece al conjunto de los números reales

Por otra parte, los casos en los cuales pueden ser aplicado el método que será descrito en este punto, corresponden a aquellos en donde D(s) no es igual a 0.

La Ecuación (2.50) permite representar diversas situaciones para la señal de excitación x(t), y cuyos casos son mostrados a continuación mediante la Tabla 2.1

Es importante hacer notar que la operación

ejecuta mediante la operación límite, es decir,

EJEMPLO 2.6 Considere un sistema LDCID con modelo matemático definido por:

Para el sistema representado por la Ecuación (2.52), determine la respuesta permanente del sistema si la señal de excitación es:

Solución. Dado que el coeficiente a3 es igual a uno, se puede aplicar el operador p a la Ecuación (2.52) obteniéndose:

Respuesta Completa

La respuesta completa del sistema se consigue sumando la respuesta transitoria u homogénea con la respuesta permanente o solución particular, es decir:

donde los coeficientes ci para todo i = 1; …. ;n se obtiene de n condiciones conocidas, en concordancia con el grado de la ecuación característica N(p), es decir, los coeficientes ci

para todo i = 1; …. ;n son determinados por el conocimiento de:

Por ejemplo, el problema ahora es hallar la respuesta completa del sistema, bajo las condiciones:

Solución. Claramente se tiene que el término a3 = 1, hecho que permite aplicar el operador p directamente a la Ecuación (2.52), arrojando el polinomio característico

D(p) = p3 +8p2 +19p+12, y cuyas raíces que lo anulan son r1 = -1, r2 = -3 y r3 = -4.

Como consecuencia del análisis hecho, se tiene que la solución homogénea está dada por:

De las Ecuaciones (2.53) y (2.57) se puede afirmar que la solución completa es:

Al resolver el sistema de ecuaciones lineales definido por la Ecuación (2.60)

se obtiene que c1 = 1/3, c2 = -3/2 y c3 = 5/3, los cuales al ser sustituido en la Ecuación (2.58) se llega a:

Literature Review by: Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas.

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Ecuador (Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca)

WhatsApp: 00593984950376

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

FIRST and SECOND ORDER SYSTEMS

FIRST and SECOND ORDER SYSTEMS

 

Fuentes:

  1. Control Systems Engineering, Norman Nise
    1. Introduction Chapter 4 pp 162 (162)
    2. Poles and Zeros 4.1 pp 162 –
    3. First Order System 4.3 pp 165-168
    4. Second Order System 4.4 pp 168-177
  2. Modern_Control_Engineering__4t
    1. Introduction Chapter 5 pp 219 (232)
    2. First Order Systems 221 (234)-224
    3. Second Order System pp 225(238)-229

 

 

TIME DOMAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

Analisis de sistemas de control en el dominio del tiempo

FIRST ORDER SYSTEMS

We now discuss first-order systems without zeros to define a performance specification for such a system…

We now use Eqs. (4.6), (4.7), and (4.8) to define three transient response performance specifications:

 

  • Time Constant: We call 1/a the time constant of the response. From Eq. (4.7), the time constant can be described as the time for to decay to 37% of its initial value. Alternately, from Eq. (4.8) the time constant is the time it takes for the step response to rise to 63% of its final value.

The reciprocal of the time constant has the units (1/seconds), or frequency. Thus, we can call the parameter a the exponential frequency. Thus, the time constant can be considered a transient response specification for a first order system, since it is related to the speed at which the system responds to a step input.Since the pole of the transfer function is at a, we can say the pole is located at the reciprocal of the time constant, and the farther the pole from the imaginary axis, the faster the transient response.

 

  • Rise Time (Tr): Rise time is defined as the time for the waveform to go from 0.1 to 0.9 of its final value.

 

  • Settling Time (Ts): Settling time is defined as the time for the response to reach, and stay within, 2% of its final value.2

Fuente [1]

Fuente [3]

Fuente [3]

SECOND-ORDER SYSTEMS

Literature Review by: Larry Francis Obando – Technical Specialist

Escuela de Ingeniería Eléctrica de la Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas.

Escuela de Ingeniería Electrónica de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Valle de Sartenejas.

Escuela de Turismo de la Universidad Simón Bolívar, Núcleo Litoral.

Contact: Ecuador (Quito, Guayaquil, Cuenca)

WhatsApp: 00593984950376

email: dademuchconnection@gmail.com

Copywriting, Content Marketing, Tesis, Monografías, Paper Académicos, White Papers (Español – Inglés)

PAGE_BREAK: PageBreak

Los sistemas de control son sistemas dinámicos.

Concepto de sistema dinámico.

Lo primero que hay que entender sobre los sistemas de control es que son sistemas dinámicos. Según Ogata (1987), autor de uno de los libros más utilizados en las escuelas de ingeniería de control, un sistema es dinámico cuando su salida en el presente depende de una entrada en el pasado. La otra opción es cuando la salida presente del sistema depende sólo de una entrada en el presente, en cuyo caso el sistema se hace llamar estático. Cuando un sistema dinámico no está en su estado de equilibrio, la salida cambia con el tiempo. Mientras, en un sistema estático, la salida permanece constante si la entrada no cambia; es decir, la salida sólo cambia si cambia su entrada. Una breve introducción es ejecutada por el profesor Pedro Albertos de la UPV en el link: Systems and Signals Examples.

Las Figuras 1 y 2 son ejemplos de sistemas estáticos y dinámicos respectivamente. La primera muestra la relación de balance en una palanca apoyada sobre un fulcro (punto de apoyo). El valor presente de la salida y(t) depende del valor presente de la entrada u(t). La segunda muestra que la velocidad y posición de un vehículo depende de una entrada en el pasado.

 

Ejemplo de sistema estático

Figura 1. Ejemplo de sistema estático (Albertos, 2016)

 

Ejemplo de sistema dinámico

Figura 2. Ejemplo de sistema dinámico (Albertos, 2016)

Los sistemas artificiales tales como la plataforma petrolera de la Figura 3, o la cabina de un avión de la Figura 4, son también ejemplos de sistemas dinámicos de alta complejidad  fabricados por los seres humanos:

 

Ejemplo de sistema dinámico. Sistema artificial 1

Figura 3. Sistema Artificial (Albertos,2016)

 

Ejemplo de sistema dinámico. Sistema artificial 2

Figura 4. Sistema Artificial. (Albertos,2016)

La respuesta transitoria.

En relación a los sistemas de control, Nise (2011) define un sistema dinámico de la siguiente manera: “A control system is dynamic: It responds to an input by undergoing a transient response before reaching a steady-state response that generally resembles the input” [Nise, 2011, p. 10]  (Un sistema de control es dinámico: responde a una entrada por medio de una respuesta transitoria antes de alcanzar una respuesta en estado estable que generalmente sigue, intenta igualar, a la entrada). La Figura 5 muestra un sistema para controlar la posición de una antena. Aquí, la salida es la posición angular  (Azimuth Angle), mientras que la entrada es la señal  emitida por el potenciómetro. La Figura 6 muestra la salida (línea azul) del sistema mostrado en la Figura 5, en términos de la respuesta transitoria y la respuesta en estado estable, para ambos casos: alta ganancia y baja ganancia.

Ejemplo de sistema dinámico. Sistema de control de posición.

Figura 5. Sistema de control de posición (Nise, 2016)

Ejemplo de sistema dinámico. Respuesta de Sistema de control de posición ejemplo 5.

Figura 6. Respuesta transitoria y respuesta en estado estable del sistema de control de posición de la Figura 5.

La intención, la misión del sistema de control de la Figura 5, es colocar la antena en la posición indicada por la entrada, por eso la salida sigue a la entrada. Observando la gráfica de la Figura 6 podemos verificar la característica principal de un sistema dinámico. La entrada o input, se presenta en el tiempo t=0. La respuesta a partir de allí, en cualquier tiempo futuro depende de la entrada en el pasado, o sea, aquella que se presentó en el tiempo t=0. La respuesta transitoria corresponde a aquella que se presenta antes de alcanzar el estado estable, el cual es el valor final de la respuesta del sistema. En la imagen podemos observar dos respuestas transitorias. La primera, de alta ganancia (hig gain), genera alta fluctuación antes de alcanzar el estado estable, pero tiene la ventaja de que es muy rápida en alcanzar el valor final (output), mientras la segunda, de baja ganancia (low gain), presenta poca fluctuación, pero tarda mucho más en alcanzar el valor final. En la primera respuesta podemos imaginar a la antena moviéndose con rapidez súbita y zigzagueando alrededor de su posición final. En el segundo caso, la antena se moverá más lentamente hacia su posición final, a la cual llegará de una manera mucho más amortiguada, serena. La selección de una u otra respuesta dependerá de la necesidad del operador y de los límites de estabilidad del sistema que por lo general se establecen en los requerimientos iniciales.

Sistemas LTI.

Estudiar un sistema de control exige obtener en primer lugar, el modelo matemático de dicho sistema, lo que en realidad implica el desarrollo del modelo de un sistema dinámico.

Un modelo matemático es percibido como un conjunto de ecuaciones que representa la dinámica de un sistema de manera exacta o aproximada. La dinámica de un sistema mecánico, eléctrico o biológico, puede ser representada mediante ecuaciones diferenciales (Ogata, 2002). En general, resolver un problema por lo general requiere en su primera etapa de contar con un modelo sencillo, simplificado, de manera tal que visualizar la solución sea una tarea lo más práctica posible. Para lograr un modelo simplificado, el ingeniero de control debe decidir cuáles de las variables y relaciones físicas son esenciales para el modelo, y cuáles pueden despreciarse (Ogata, 1987). (Por ejemplo, para estudiar el desplazamiento de un resorte que actúa a baja frecuencia, se puede despreciar su masa. Pero, cuando el mismo resorte actúa a alta frecuencia, su masa influye de manera determinante en su desplazamiento, por tanto, no puede despreciarse. De allí a que la ecuación que gobierna el desplazamiento del resorte es más sencilla a baja frecuencia).

Una vez que se tiene una idea aproximada sobre el tipo y la cobertura de la solución, de la conducta y respuesta natural del sistema, el modelo puede ser optimizado, transformándose en uno de mayor complejidad que requiera de la aplicación de software especializado en análisis y simulación, para obtener información oculta en la profundidad de dicha complejidad.

A propósito de la tarea de realizar un modelo, el Prof. del MIT John Sterman comparte su filosofía con nosotros sobre la eficacia de un modelo, mediante las siguientes palabras:

“Every model is a representation of a system…But for a model to be useful, it must address a specific problem and must simplify rather than attempt to mirror an entire system in detail…the usefulness of models lies in the fact that they simplify reality, creating a representation of it we can comprehend…Von Clausewitz famously cautioned that the map is not the territory. It´s a good thing it isn´t: A map as detailed as the territory would be of no use” [Sterman, 2000, p. 89] . (Cada modelo es una representación de un sistema…Pero para que un modelo sea útil, debe enfocarse en un problema específico y debe simplificar en vez de intentar una representación del sistema completo en detalle…la utilidad de los modelos radica en el hecho de que ellos simplifican la realidad, creando una representación de ella que nosotros podamos comprender… Von Clausewitz ofreció su famosa alerta sobre el hecho de que el mapa no es el territorio: Un mapa tan detallado como el territorio sería completamente inútil)

Para obtener las ecuaciones que conforman los modelos de sistemas dinámicos los ingenieros utilizan las leyes de la física, aplicadas a las propiedades de estos sistemas, buscando siempre el camino más fácil para sintetizar el modelo. Entre las propiedades de los sistemas más útiles para alcanzar este objetivo, se encuentran la propiedad de linealidad y la invariancia en el tiempo, básicamente por dos razones principales. En primer lugar, una inmensa cantidad de procesos físicos, sobre todo aquellos que interesan a la ciencia, poseen ambas propiedades. En segundo lugar, los sistemas lineales e invariantes en el tiempo, conocidos también como Sistemas LTI (Linear Time Invariant) son ampliamente accesibles en términos de herramientas disponibles para su análisis. La ciencia de las señales y sistemas ha alcanzado un poderoso desarrollo de estas herramientas, permitiendo que personas de todos los ámbitos académicos puedan aproximarse con facilidad al análisis de los sistemas LTI (Oppenheim, 1996). Es por eso que la comprensión de los sistemas LTI se convierte en la siguiente tarea en la preparación para el análisis de un sistema de control.

Concepto de análisis y diseño.

Antes de profundizar sobre las características de un sistema LTI, es necesario definir las áreas básicas de trabajo del ingeniero de control (Ogata, 1986): el análisis, el diseño y la síntesis de sistemas.

Análisis: es el estudio del funcionamiento de un sistema en condiciones específicas, cuyo modelo matemático se conoce. Por lo general se hacen variar los valores de los parámetros involucrados en los modelos matemáticos para observar las diferentes respuestas y de allí sacar conclusiones. Como el análisis depende del modelo matemático, es independiente del tipo de sistema físico de que se trate, sea este mecánico, eléctrico, hidráulico, etc.

Diseño: dada una tarea específica, se trata del proceso para encontrar el sistema que cumpla con esa tarea. Por lo general no es directo y requiere ensayo y error. El diseño implica por tanto aclarar los requerimientos para el sistema, generalmente dados en términos cuantitativos y cualitativos. Luego, el ingeniero recurre a la síntesis. Una vez dotado de un modelo, mediante simulación computarizada lo analiza para predecir el cumplimiento de los requerimientos. Aplicando ensayo y error, modifica el modelo, hasta aproximarse lo más posible al resultado deseado. De ser posible, fabrica un prototipo y continúa el análisis, hasta cumplir con el objetivo final.

Síntesis: es el uso de un procedimiento explícito para encontrar un sistema que funcione de manera específica. En este caso, las características del sistema se postulan al principio, y luego se utilizan varias técnicas matemáticas para dar con ese sistema.

Existen por tanto, dos métodos de diseño (Distefano et al, 1995):

  1. Diseño por análisis: hecho por medio de la modificación de las características de un sistema que ya existe;
  2. Diseño por síntesis: definición de un sistema a partir de sus especificaciones

En relación a los sistemas de control, Nise expone en los siguientes términos las funciones de un ingeniero: “…we discuss three major objectives of systems analysis and design: producing the desired transient response, reducing steady-state error, and achieving stability” [Nise, 2011, p. 10]. (Discutimos tres objetivos principales en el análisis y diseño de sistemas: producir la respuesta transitoria deseada, reducir el error en estado estable y lograr estabilidad).

Caso de aplicación.

Para ilustrar el proceso de obtención de la dinámica de un sistema, utilizaremos el popular del sistema masa-resorte-amortiguador montado en un carro, mostrado en la Figura 7

Sistema masa-resorte-amortiguador, montado en carro

Figura 7. Sistema masa-resorte-amortiguador, montado en un carro. 

Se supone que el sistema está en reposo en . Lo primero que se debe determinar es cuál es la entrada y cual es la salida del sistema en estudio, a la vez que asignarles un nombre en forma de función dependiente del tiempo, a cada una de ellas. El sistema masa-resorte-amortiguador se moverá en el momento en que el carro se mueve, por lo que el movimiento  del carro es la entrada, mientras que el desplazamiento  de la masa es la salida. De manera intuitiva podemos prever que si  tiene una dirección, digamos a la derecha, entonces  tendrá la misma dirección pero con sentido contrario, es decir, a la izquierda.

En el instante  el carro se mueve con una velocidad constante, que se representa como la derivada de su desplazamiento con respecto al tiempo, es decir .

El amortiguador actúa como una fricción ante el movimiento de la masa . Dicha masa se desplaza con velocidad . Si la constante del amortiguador de la Figura 7 es , la fuerza que ejerce para oponerse a todo movimiento será proporcional a la velocidad de ese movimiento, en nuestro caso a  con pendiente , es decir, estamos ante una función lineal que representa la fuerza de fricción  ejercida por el amortiguador al desplazamiento de la masa , y que es igual a . Pero la función  ejerce su influencia sobre  a través del amortiguador, por lo que  tiene un segundo componente que favorece el movimiento de . Dicho desplazamiento es proporcional a  y tiene sentido contrario a . De acuerdo con Newton, ambas fuerzas producen una aceleración en la masa  que podemos denominar . La relación entre estas fuerzas y dicha aceleración viene dada por la relación formulada por la segunda Ley de Newton:    o bien .

El resorte por su parte, también se opone al movimiento de la masa , pero a su vez lo favorece porque el carro también transmite su influencia a la masa a través del resorte. Si la constante del resorte es , y la aceleración de la masa debido al resorte es , la fuerza total  que ejerce el resorte sobre la masa es igual a , o bien,

Ahora bien, la expresión matemática que resume la relación entre la aceleración  total aplicada sobre la masa , y las fuerzas  y , siguiendo la segunda Ley de Newton, es la siguiente:

La ecuación anterior representa la dinámica del sistema, un modelo matemático constituido generalmente por ecuaciones diferenciales como se explicaba en los primeros párrafos de este documento.